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Egyptian Priest: Nesperennub
Nesperennub
Biographical Information
Name(s) Nesperennub
Age 40
Sex Male
Status Preist
Height Approx 173.00 cm
Source
Culture Egyptian
Date(s) 800BC
Site Luxor, Egypt
Current Location
Location The British Museum
Catalog # N/A
Nesperennub was a priest at Karanak in the ancient city of Thebes in around 800BC[1], which in modern day would be Luxor. The possible cause of his death was a small hole found above the left eye that could be the sign of a possibly fatal illness (cancer or tumor), he died around 40 years old.[2] Nesperennub was buried in the Valley of Kings on the West banks of the Nile[1], this signifies that he was a powerful noble because the Valley of Kings is the burial place for major royal figures of Egypt.

Mummification

Nesperennub underwent a the standard 70 day mummification process. His internal organs were removed except for the heart, he was also coated with linen and resign to keep him from rotting in his tomb. Nesperennub's eyes were replaced with glass eyes so that he could see into the afterlife [1] and was decorated with jewlery and other meaningful symbols. Above Nesperennub's right eye there is wax in the shape of a cobra. Wax, in ancient Egypt, was considered magical and cobras were the symbols for the ancient cobra goddess who would protect people in the afterlife.[3] All these details found from the mummification process were uncovered without unwrapping or even opening Nesperennub's coffin.

Studies

Nesperennub was the first mummy ever used for an experiment involving CT scans to see the mummy without destroying it's placement and wrappings.[2] Something unusual in Nesperennub's coffin was a strange bowl shaped object above his head.[2] This is not known to be apart of any mummification ritual in ancient Egypt. The software used to scan Nesperennub's body can reveal textures and impressions left by nerve endings under his skull.[1] Because of this CT scan, Nesperennub has been nicknamed the 'virtual-reality mummy' for it's contribution to technology and archaeology.

References

1. Virtual-reality mummy. (2002, March 11). Retrieved September 24,2015, from http://www.nature.com/news/2002/020304/full/news/020304-11.html

2. Mummy of Nesperennub. (n.d.). Retrieved September 24, 2015, from http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/aes/m/mummy_of_nesperennub.aspx

3. The skeleton. (n.d.). Retrieved September 24, 2015, from http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/young_explorers/childrens_online_tours/journey_into_the_mummy/the_skeleton.aspx

  • Nesperennub's Wooden Coffin (Exterior)
  • Nesperennub's Wooden Coffin (Interior)
  • Eloquently Painted Cartonnage Case
  • Layers of linen soaked in glue or plaster was applied to create the case
  • Wrapped mummy of Nesperennub (© Photographic imagery courtesy of SGI)
  • Proposed Nesperennub Skeleton
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